• Bank America, The World Wildlife Fund and the Financing of Deforestation & Climate Change

    This post is inspired by Hiroko Tabuchi’s recent Article in the New York Times entitled, How Big Banks Are Putting Rain Forests in Peril. According to World Resources Institute, only 15% of the world’s forests remain intact, 30% have been cleared, 20% degraded and 35% fragmented.   The most recent culprit can be found in half

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  • Children on the Frontlines of Climate Change

    Highlighted by Radio Canada International (RCI), UNICEF released a report linking the current super El Nino to children suffering. In addition to Southern Africa’s food shortages that we wrote about in our article last week, Man-Made? El Nino, Global Warming and 60 Million People Facing Severe Food Shortages, this most recent report discusses flooding and optimal living conditions for mosquitoes

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  • Man-Made? El Nino, Global Warming and 60 Million People Facing Severe Food Shortages

    The Southern African Development Community, comprised of 15 countries, announced this week an appeal for $2.7 billion in aid, due to the region’s worst drought in 30 years. 23 million people are in urgent need of assistance. 5 of the 15 countries have declared state of emergencies. Southern Africa had already been subject to two failed rainy

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  • Impact Investing: Increasing Participation in the Global Economy

    In recent posts we have written about malnutrition and children’s stunting rates in India, social enterprises in England and a business executive fighting modern day slavery.  This post attempts to demonstrate the interrelatedness of these and many of the world’s most serious challenges. In the Nagada village within the Jajpur district of India, 12 children

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  • Africa Without Lions: Where Is Your Pride?

    Great article in the Opinion section of New York Times by Richard Conniff this week on the dramatic decline in African lion populations, “Angry Tweets Won’t Help African Lions.”  In West and Central Africa only a total of 400 lions remain. The culprit? They have a highly motivated competitor for their prey… impoverished Africans.  According

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  • Unfit For Habitation (P3/3): The World’s Largest Slums

    Would you believe that the US has one of the top ten slums in the world?  Hidalgo County, Texas is home to 52,000. Here is the 10 largest list: 10. Hidalgo County, United States – 52 Thousand 9. Rocinha, Brazil – 69 Thousand 8. Khayelitsha, South Africa – 392 Thousand 7. Cité Soleil, Port-au-Prince, Haiti

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  • Unfit For Habitation (P2/3): The World’s Slums and Children

    A billion children live in cities and towns.  Thus, according to overall population studies, a third of these children live in slums. As with their rural counterparts, these children lack access to clean water, electricity, education and health facilities.  According to a recent UNICEF report these children are often getting overlooked because their statistics are

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  • Unfit For Habitation (P1/3): The World’s Slums, An Overview

    1/3 of the urban population in the developing world in 2012, or about 863 million people, lived in slums (UN-HABITAT).  The proportion of urban population living in slums was highest in Sub-Saharan Africa (61.7%), followed by South Asia (35%), Southeast Asia (31%), East Asia (28.2%), West Asia (24.6%), Oceania (24.1%), Latin America and the Caribbean

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  • Global Water Crisis: Matt Damon, Good Will Found

    Will: “That may be, but at least I won’t be unoriginal. But I mean, if you have a problem with that, I mean, we could just step outside – we could figure it out” (Good Will Hunting). “It’s an absolute, just white-knuckle crisis right now for three-quarters of a billion people,” Damon said. “It’s killing

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  • Global Water Crisis: Children

    Every year, approximately 60 million children are born into homes without access to sanitation. Water in Accra, Ghana, costs three times as much as in New York.  Nearly half the people who gained access to water between 1990 and 2008 live in India and China.  Women in Africa and Asia often carry water on their

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  • Sebastiao Salgado: Social Photographer & Upcoming Documentary

    The life and work of Sebastiao Salgado is detailed in an upcoming documentary, “Salt of the Earth.”  Salgado is a Brazilian social documentary photographer and photojournalist.  Described by some as the most important photographer of the 21st century, Salgado has more recently turned his sights to the environment.   Many times his earlier worked depicted the

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  • Rhino Kills: It’s Do Or Die

    The environment ministry of South Africa has published rhino poaching data that points to a 21% increase (2014 vs. 2013) in the killing of rhinos for their horns.  2013 was also a record setting year.  Rhino horn is valued at $30,000 per pound on the black market.  See National Geographic’s aritcle. Lower Photo: Michael Raimondo/WWF

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  • Top 10 Celebrity Humanitarians: Hayden Panettiere, Selena Gomez & Arrest Warrants?

    Last year “TheRichest” published…”Top 10 Celebrities Who Are Active in Disaster Relief and Humanitarian Work.”  Coming in at #9 and #10 were Selena Gomez and Hayden Panettiere respectively, including Hayden’s Japanese arrest warrant for her speaking out against the whaling industry and Selena’s work against female violence in the Congo. Photo: Hayden Panettiere at the

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  • The Global Water Crisis

    THE GLOBAL WATER CRISIS: According to the United Nations, every day 4,400 children under the age of 5 die around the world, having fallen sick because of unclean water and sanitation. In fact, five times as many children die each year of diarrhea as of HIV/AIDS. A third of the world’s population is enduring some

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  • Droughts & Famines

    Children in Somalia have already survived war, hunger, floods and forced dislocation. Today, together with more than 8 million people across the drought-stricken Horn of Africa, Somali children are threatened by famine, disease and further displacement as families migrate in search of water and food. (UNICEF. See, Photo Essay – Drought in southern Somalia). In

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  • The Horn of Africa That Was Not Heard

    Recently, the Horn of Africa experienced its worst famine in 60 years.  With 12 million at risk of starvation, an UNBELIEVABLE 29,000 Somali children are believed to have died last year.  While the US contributed half of the emergency funds that were provided to the UN, less than half of the overall appeal was pledged.

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